Racial equality would create a better world for every child.

Activities for Kids to Teach Racial Equality

by Kathryn Rateliff Barr

"Red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in God's sight." Your child sings about a world where all children are treated equally and loved. She has friends of various races and treats them all equally. She learned that from watching you. You teach her about a world where all children are treated with love, respect and equality.

1. Martin Luther King Day

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. visualized a world where all were equal. Participate in activities that celebrate Dr. King’s legacy with your preschooler, such as learning about African-American history, marching for peace or attending a MLK Day parade in your community. Read books such as David A. Adler’s “A Picture Book of Martin Luther King, Jr,” Arnold Adoff’s “Black is Brown is Tan” or “No Mirrors in My Nana's House” by Mary Hoffman. Discuss Dr. King’s dream with your child and ask her what her ideal world would be like.

2. World Citizens

Your preschooler identifies himself by family, city, state and nation. Help him identify as a citizen of the world by working together to design a flag and a badge that represents all people on the earth. Say, “Each state and our nation has a flag. Here are emblems that represent each state. Can you help me design one for the whole world?" Ask your child, “What rules would be fair for everyone? ” He might suggest people treat others the way they want to be treated.

3. Sharing Cultures

Encourage your child to learn more about the cultures represented in your community. Attend cultural fairs together and talk to people of various races. Let her interview people about their culture, asking, “What kinds of foods do you eat? What kinds of games do children play where you used to live? ” Explore different cultural foods and play games common to a specific culture or read a book about children in another land.

4. Arts and Crafts

Racial equality is a step toward peace. Let your child create a paper peace dove mobile with the dove’s body cut from stiff cardboard and tail and wing feathers created from accordion-pleated typing paper. Explain, "The dove represents a peaceful world. " Help him link the hands of various colored paper dolls to create a representation of all people of the world. Tell him, "Everyone doesn't have the same color skin or look the same. These dolls represent all the children of the world."

About the Author

Rev. Kathryn Rateliff Barr has taught birth, parenting, vaccinations and alternative medicine classes since 1994. She is a pastoral family counselor and has parented birth, step, adopted and foster children. She holds bachelor's degrees in English and history from Centenary College of Louisiana. Studies include midwifery, naturopathy and other alternative therapies.

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