How to Change the Spray Hose on a Kohler Kitchen Faucet

by Gus Stephens

Many Kohler lever-operated kitchen faucets incorporate a pull-out sprayer head. The head can be removed from the faucet and hand-held to more conveniently clean items in the sink. A button on the sprayer toggles between stream mode and spray mode. Flexible water supply lines convey water from the cold and hot supply valves to the mixer inside the faucet body. A single flexible high-pressure water line conveying mixed water connects to the flexible spray head hose beneath the sink.

1 Shut off the water supply to the faucet at both the hot and cold water valves beneath the sink.

2 Disconnect the flexible spray heat supply line from the high-pressure water line underneath the faucet by depressing the gray button on the quick connector at the end of the high-pressure water line.

3 Loosen the two screws clamping the spray head hose weight to the hose and slide the weight off the end of the hose.

4 Take the spray head out of the neck of the faucet and pull the hose straight out of the faucet body until it is completely clear of the faucet.

5 Unscrew the spray head from the threaded socket at the end of the spray head hose and discard the old hose.

6 Screw the spray head into the threaded socket on the end of the replacement hose.

7 Feed the other end of the spray hose into the opening in the neck of the faucet body until the full length of the hose is inserted.

8 Slide the spray hose weight over the connector at the end of the spray hose beneath the sink and secure it approximately nine inches from the connector by tightening the two clamping screws.

9 Push the end of the spray hose into the quick connection socket on the end of the flexible high-pressure water hose and until it clicks and the connection is secure.

10 Turn on the water supply to the faucet at both the hot and cold water supply valves beneath the sink.

11 Run the faucet for a short time and check for leaks.

Items you will need

  • Screwdriver

About the Author

Gus Stephens has written about aviation, automotive and home technology for 15 years. His articles have appeared in major print outlets such as "Popular Mechanics" and "Invention & Technology." Along the way, Gus earned a Bachelor of Arts in communications. If it flies, drives or just sits on your desk and blinks, he's probably fixed it.