Daffodil flowers grow well in sandy loam soil.

Flowers & Vegetables for Sandy Loam Soil

by Grace Wathen

Sandy loam soil is a sand-based soil mixture. Certain types of flowering shrubs or plants do well in sandy loam soil because it gives the plants the type of water drainage they need. Vegetable plants that do not need a lot of nutrients from soil will also do well in sandy loam soil. However, sandy loam soil can be supplemented with specific amendments to make it more moist and fertile.

1. Sandy Loam Soil

Sandy loam soil is a specific type of soil mixture that consists of mostly sand. This type of soil also has a small amount of clay and silt in the mixture to balance it out. Sandy loam soil is usually used for plants that need a little more water drainage than others. It can also be a beneficial soil if you are someone who tends to over water your plants. Sandy loam soil can be found in coarse, fine and very fine varieties. However, the finer the variety, the less drainage it has.

2. Flowers for Sandy Loam Soil

Some flowering shrubs and perennial flowers grow well in sandy loam soil. One example of a flowering shrub that grows well in sandy loam soil is the mock orange shrub (Philadelphus coronarius). The white blooms on this shrub blossom in the summer and are very fragrant. The shrub grows best in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zone 5 and can grow up to 10 feet tall. One perennial flower that does well in sandy loam soil is the daffodil (Narcissus spp.). Grown best in USDA zone 5, the daffodil plant produces white or yellow flowers in the late winter and early spring. The large blossoms often resemble a trumpet.

3. Vegetables for Sandy Loam Soil

Root vegetables such as carrots (Daucus carota) or parsnips (Pastinaca sativa) grow well in sandy loam soil. Carrots grow best in USDA zones 4 to 10 and parsnips in USDA zones 2 to 9. Both carrots and parsnips should be planted in late winter and will be ready to harvest in late spring. Squash (Cucurbita spp.) and its varieties, such as winter or summer squashes, also do well in sandy loam soil. Not all root vegetables grow well in sandy loam soil. The brassica family of vegetables, such as broccoli (Brassica oleracea), need more nutrients than sandy loam soil can provide.

4. Other Considerations

Before planting in your garden, you may want to have the soil tested to determine its exact pH balance. That way, even if you do stick to flowers and vegetables that do well in sandy loam soil, you will know how to supplement the plants if they are struggling. If you have sandy loam soil and are not able to grow exactly what you desire, consider adding to your soil to make it more moist and fertile. Organic matter, such as compost, can be added to your soil to improve its fertility. Be patient, though; improving soil fertility takes time.

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