Use a hole punch to create fun activities for your little ones.

Hole Punch Activities for Kids

by Kelly Sundstrom

You use your hole punch for office work, but you may not think about how easy it is to put together activities with your children using a hole punch. Toddlers and preschoolers love to play with the little paper circles that come out of the hole punch, which can end up all over your living-room floor. Use a hole punch to create crafts that your kids can make and enjoy much longer than just tossing that confetti around.

1. Hole-Punch Holiday Acivities

Have you ever caught your little ones with your hole puncher and a sheet of paper? After they're finished with it, it kind of looks like a snowflake, doesn't it? This is great when you want to make holiday crafts with your children (though not so great when the paper they use is a bill or an important paper). Show your kids how to make a real holiday craft using a hole punch and craft or construction paper. Fold a sheet of construction paper in half, then in half again to create a square. Allow your little ones to punch holes out of the folded paper wherever they want to. Just make sure not to fold it any more, or the hole punch will not work. When you open the paper back up, it will look like a symmetrical snowflake. You can also have your children color a piece of paper to look like a winter scene with crayons or markers, then spray the picture with spray adhesive. Punch out a bunch of holes from a sheet of white printer paper and let your little artists sprinkle the paper holes all over their picture to create "snow."

2. Hole-Punch Mosaic Activities

Chances are you don't have a bunch of little tiles or pieces of glass around the house, but you can show your tiny tots how to make a beautiful mosaic just as well using colorful paper punched-out holes. Have them help you punch out paper holes from many different colors of paper. Try to separate the holes into piles with similar colors if at all possible. Draw a simple picture on a separate sheet of paper, and cover the picture with craft glue. Show your children how to carefully place the colored paper holes onto the picture to create a hole-punch mosaic. You can use the punched-out holes to create a mosaic on picture frames as well. Start by applying a layer of craft glue over a blank craft frame, and let your children cover the glued areas with colorful paper punched-out holes.

3. Hole-Punch Weaving and Sewing Activities

Toddlers and preschoolers tend to be lacking in fine motor skills, but you can help them improve those abilities by putting together a weaving or sewing hole-punch activity just right for their age. To make a weaving activity, punch holes all over a sheet of craft or construction paper, spacing the holes 2 inches apart. Show your children how to insert pieces of colorful yarn through the holes horizontally, then insert pieces of yarn back and forth vertically to create a woven design. Alternatively, punch out holes around the edge of two pieces of construction paper, spacing the holes 2 inches apart. Have your child place the two pieces of paper on top of each other, and help your child sew the two sheets of paper together using a yarn needle with colorful yarn attached.

4. Hole-Punch Window Activities

When your walls are plastered with loads of your children's artwork, your windows might feel left out of all the fun. Make window art with your children using a hole punch and a few other really cheap craft supplies. Start by having your children punch out holes from a sheet of craft or construction paper using a hole punch, then lay the paper on a flat surface. Place a piece of clear tape over each hole, then let your children color over each piece of tape using wax crayons. When you hang the paper up in your window, all of the holes will look like stained glass. Make a similar craft by punching the holes out from colorful kite paper, then taping a second piece of kite paper behind it. The paper behind the punched-out paper will be seen through when you hang it up in a window.

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