Most shavers come with a handy cleaning brush perfect for reaching into the shaver safely.

How to Oil an Electric Razor

by Mimi Bullock

If you love the feeling of smooth skin but hate enduring painful nicks and razor burn, you should reach for an electric razor. Whether you prefer shaving in the shower or when skin is dry, electric razors can whisk the hair away. This type of razor contains a small motor that powers the cutting blades. After some use, you need to clean and lubricate the cutting blades and razor head to maintain an even and pain-free shave.

1 Review the cleaning suggestions in the product manual. Learn how to remove the cutter housing safely, without damaging your razor.

2 Unplug the razor and remove the protective cap that covers the blades. Lift off the head frame that covers the shaving blades. If you see a foil screen, do not touch it with your fingers. This piece is fragile and tears easily.

3 Use the razor brush to remove the whiskers from the blades and foil. Once a month, carefully remove the blades and foil. Soak them in a small bowl of rubbing alcohol for one minute. This will disinfect the machine, keeping it safe to use. Place the parts on a clean cloth and allow them to dry a few minutes. Return the clean blades and foil to the machine.

4 Spray the exposed blades and foil with a blast of lubricant. You should use the lubricant suggested by the manufacturer. Alternatively, you can add a few drops of mineral or baby oil to the blades and foil. Do not use heavy oils like motor oil or olive oil.

5 Snap the head frame back into place. Plug in the razor and flip the power on. Allow the razor to run a few seconds. This will move the oil around, lubricating the razors.

Items you will need

  • Razor brush
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Bowl
  • Cloth
  • Spray lubricant
  • Mineral or baby oil

Tip

  • Treating your skin with pre-shave oil will keep the shaver lubricated between cleanings.

About the Author

Mimi Bullock's writing reflects her love of traveling the back roads of small towns and sampling the local cuisine. As a regular feature writer for "Southern Hospitality Traveler" and journalist for "Beachin' Magazine," she gets to experience the rich heritage of the southern culture. She is also a licensed cosmetologist who has her own skin care line.

Photo Credits

  • Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images