Parents and teachers need to discuss potty training tips for toddlers.

Parent-Teacher Roles in Potty Training

by Tania K. Cowling

Potty training is an important milestone for toddlers. The process of learning to recognize when there is a need to go, getting to the bathroom on time, taking pants off, wiping, getting dressed and washing hands are all tough tasks for a little tyke. This takes a lot of patience between the parent and the daycare provider in order to make this rite of passage successful and a pleasant experience for the child. It’s time to have a little potty training 101 meeting with your caregiver so everyone is on the same page.

1. Potty Training Away From Home

Training toddlers to potty is a tough job at home, let alone if your child spends part of his day with a caregiver or at daycare. It’s really a tough job if the caregiver has several children to tend to. Clue your provider about the signs that your child is ready to use the toilet and his ability to communicate with another adult. Compare your techniques with your child’s teacher’s approach to toileting and work together on your quest to be out of diapers.

2. Toilet Versus Potty Chairs

Teach your child to use the regular toilet. There are seats that fit on top to accommodate your little one’s size and take away the fear of falling inside. Potty chairs are germ collectors and hard to keep sanitary especially if more than one child uses it. And some children find the transition from the potty chair to toilet difficult -- it may be best to just start off on the toilet.

3. The Need for Praise

Get excited and praise your toddler when she uses the potty and avoid criticizing any mishaps -- accidents do happen. Using the toilet is still a new skill for little ones, and it takes a while before their bodies are mature enough to control urinating and defecating. Whether at home or at daycare, a personal toileting chart is helpful for praising toddlers. Let them place a “happy face” sticker on the chart every time they have a successful attempt at the potty.

4. Provide a Change of Clothes

Let’s face it: accidents do happen so it's best to be prepared. Send a complete change of clothing, including pants, tops, socks and underwear, to your daycare for your child. Mark each piece with your toddler’s name and place these into a large zip-closed plastic bag. You can also use this bag to send home soiled items. During the change of seasons, make sure you send the appropriate type of clothing with your child to his daycare.

About the Author

Tania K. Cowling is a former teacher, a published book author and award-winning freelance writer. Cowling is also certified in medical records technology. She has published many articles online and in regional magazines across the country.

Photo Credits

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