Daylilies have the same requirements as "Confetti."

What to Plant With Abelia Confetti

by Reannan Raine

Abelia “Confetti” (Abelia x grandiflora “Confetti” or “Conti”) is a dwarf glossy abelia cultivar that can be used to brighten a landscape with its variegated foliage and bright white summer flowers. Only 2 feet tall and 3 feet wide, it's suitable for foundation or border plantings and for use as an accent shrub around a larger specimen plant. "Confetti" is hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 6 to 9. When selecting other plants to include in the landscape, consider only those with the same soil, sun and moisture requirements as "Confetti."

1. “Confetti” Cultural Requirements

“Confetti” requires at least four hours of direct sun exposure every day. Take a look at the planting site to see how much sunlight it gets each day. While this shrub will thrive in partial shade or full sun, many plants that could be planted with it may require full sun or may need partial shade. The soil should be organically rich and drain quickly. This is a drought-tolerant shrub, but it should be watered every seven to 10 days during extended dry periods.

2. Yellow Flowers

“Happy Returns” daylilies (Hermerocallis “Happy Returns”) and marigolds (Tagetes spp.) can be planted around “Confetti” shrubs to bring bright, cheery yellows, golds and oranges into the landscape. “Happy Returns” daylilies are herbaceous perennials that are hardy in USDA zones 5 to 9. They grow to a height and width of 1 to 1 1/2 feet and bloom in lemon yellow from spring to fall. There are also daylily cultivars available with flowers in every color except blue and pure white. Marigolds are annuals that can be anywhere from 6 inches to 4 feet tall, depending on the species or cultivar. Daylilies and marigolds thrive in full sun or partial shade and have the same soil and water requirements as “Confetti.”

3. Blue Flowers

“Blue Star” kalimeris (Kalimeris incisa “Blue Star”) and blue-flowering dwarf lobelia (Lobelia erinus) can be planted with “Confetti” for a dramatic blue-and-white theme. “Blue Star” is an herbaceous perennial that is hardy in USDA zones 5 to 9. The plant grows to a height and width of 1 to 1 1/2 feet and produces pale blue, daisy-type flowers from spring to fall. Dwarf lobelia is hardy in USDA zones 10 and 11, although it can be grown as an annual everywhere. Depending on the variety, it is either a compact 4- to 6-inch tall plant or has a sprawling form with stems up to 1 1/2 feet long. The varieties that bloom in blue produce brilliant, deep blue, pansy-type flowers in the spring and autumn. Other varieties produce white, pink, red or purple flowers. Both species thrive in full sun or partial shade and have the same soil and water requirements as “Confetti.” Lobelia is toxic when ingested, and its sap can cause skin irritation.

4. Pink Flowers

“Astra Pink” balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus “Astra Pink”) and “Supertunia Vista Bubblegum” petunia can be planted with “Confetti” for a pretty pink and white combination. “Astra Pink” is an herbaceous perennial that is hardy in USDA zones 3 to 8. The plant grows to a height of 6 to 12 inches and blooms in the spring and summer, producing 3-inch wide pink flowers. “Supertunia Vista Bubblegum” is hardy in USDA zones 10 and 11 but is grown as an annual everywhere. This deep pink-blooming petunia hybrid grows to a height and width of 1 1/2 to 2 feet and blooms from spring to fall. Balloon flowers and petunias thrive in full sun or partial shade and have the same soil and water requirements as “Confetti.” There are also blue- and white-blooming balloon flower cultivars, and petunias are available with flowers in any color except brown or black.

About the Author

Reannan Raine worked for 30 years in the non-profit sector in various positions. She recently became a licensed insurance agent but has decided to pursue a writing career instead. Ms. Raine is hoping to have her first novel published soon.

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