Air plants require no soil in which to grow.

How to Plant Air Plants in Wrought Iron Plant Stands

by Brynne Chandler

Air plants (Tillandsia spp.) come from Central and South America and the southern United States. They attach to host plants, but don’t rob nutrients from their hosts. Air plants grow outdoors in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 10 through 11. Their specialized leaves absorb nutrients from the air and from water, meaning you can grow them indoors almost anywhere. Wrought iron plant stands provide a captivating contrast to an air plant's light and lacy greenery.

1 Cut a cork mat to fit the top of the wrought iron plant stand, using a utility knife. You can cover the entire top or not, according to your personal preference.

2 Dot the back of the cork mat with hot glue and attach it to the wrought iron plant stand. This is not strictly necessary, but it gives your air plants some extra security, especially if the plant stand is in a high-traffic area where it might get bumped.

3 Place the plant stand in an area which will get full sun in the winter and partial shade during the summer.

4 Fill a bowl halfway with distilled water. Do not use tap water because air plants are sensitive to chlorine.

5 Soak the air plants in the distilled water for five to 10 minutes. Gently shake off the excess moisture.

6 Arrange the air plants on the cork mat. Place them so air can circulate freely between and around them.

Items you will need

  • Cork mat
  • Utility knife
  • Shears
  • Hot glue gun
  • Glue sticks
  • Distilled water
  • Bowl
  • Spray bottle

Tip

  • Mist the cork mat and the air plants with distilled water once a week.

Warning

  • Do not expose your air plants to temperatures colder than 45 degrees Fahrenheit because it may kill them.

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