Routine will help potty training go more smoothly.

A Potty Training Schedule for a Two Year Old

by Kathryn Hatter

Feisty 2-year-olds are part baby and part kid. If you're ready to move past the diaper stage with your 2-year-old, potty-training promises to be a memorable journey. Potty-training will occupy center stage of a 2-year-old's life for a while as she works to achieve this momentous milestone.

1. Look For Signs of Readiness

Before jumping into the potty-training task, ensure that your toddler is ready. If he's regularly staying dry for at least 1 1/2 hours during the day, this is an excellent indicator that he might be ready, according to the Program for Early Parent Support. Other signs include stopping activity to soil his diaper and insisting that you change him immediately after he finishes.

2. Starting Small for Big Success

Little people can freak easily about potty-training, so tread carefully. Make a big deal about buying a potty seat and place it in the bathroom. If your 2-year-old wants to sit on it, great! If she doesn't -- no biggie. Let her just get used to the potty seat for a while and she'll eventually be ready to use it. An effective way to ease into sitting on the potty seat is to have her sit on it every night before she has a bath. Nix all pressure, though -- this is just practice at this point.

3. Institute a Laid-Back Routine

A beginning potty-training routine for a 2-year-old should be relaxed and free of pressure, according to the Program for Early Parent Support website. Aim for sitting on the potty twice a day at times that fit your lifestyle and schedule. Continue the before-bath routine and add another time -- perhaps in the morning when you're getting your little one dressed or after lunch when he's getting ready for a nap. For best results, announce that it's time to sit on the potty -- don't ask. You know 2-year-olds and resistance.

4. Getting More Serious

As your toddler begins to have success on the potty and is staying dry for intervals of at least 1 1/2 hours during the day, make the move to training pants. This is when it's reasonable to ramp up the routine and start having your little one sit on the potty every two hours during the day. When accidents happen, deal with them matter-of-factly without scolding or punishing. Eventually, your youngster will get it and the accidents will end.

5. Finishing the Process

After your child gets to the point where he's trained during the day, you might need to hold off for nighttime training. According to the University of Alabama Parenting Assistance Line, many kids aren't physically capable of staying dry through the night until they're 4 to 6 years of age. By removing the pressure and all negativity associated with potty training, you make it a natural rite of childhood without difficulty or issues.

About the Author

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator. As a regular contributor to Natural News, many of Hatter's Internet publications focus on natural health and parenting. Hatter has also had publication on home improvement websites such as Redbeacon.

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