Gerbera daisies can grow as annuals or perennials.

How to Prune a Gerbera

by Jenny Harrington

The candy-colored orange, red yellow blooms of a gerbera daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) make it a bright addition to any sunny garden bed. Gerber daisies grow in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 8 through 10, but they are enjoyed as potted flowers everywhere. They primarily flower during the summer months, although indoor potted plants can flower at any time. Proper pruning helps prolong the blooming period, keeps plants attractive, and helps prevent the spread of fungal diseases.

1 Snip off the old flowers after the petals begin to wilt. Cut through the stem where it emerges from the base of the plant. Pruning off the dead flowers promptly prevents seed formation and may result in more flower production.

2 Examine the gerber daisy weekly during the growing season. Locate dead, damaged or diseased foliage.

3 Prune off the dead or damaged leaves with clean shears, cutting them off where they join the main plant. Rinse the shears in a solution of 1 part bleach and 9 parts water between each cut to prevent the spread of disease.

4 Cut back the entire gerbera daisy to the ground in fall after the foliage dies back naturally. Prune to within 1 to 2 inches of the ground but do not cut into the crown of the plant where the stems join the root system.

Items you will need

  • Shears
  • Bleach

Tip

  • Mulching over the bed after pruning back the gerbera daisies in fall provides insulation against winter chill. Gerberas grown in colder climates are usually potted and stored in a cool, frost-free indoor location until the following spring.

Photo Credits

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