A cute ponytail is a good way to keep a busy toddler cool.

How to Put a Toddler's Hair in a Ponytail

by Mimi Bullock

Busy toddlers want to explore the world, not endure a hairstyling session that may restrict her movements. However, as she grows, so will her hair -- and often in many wild directions. With some speed and preparation, you can reign in your child's hair without too much screaming or frustration, and a ponytail is the perfect style to accomplish just that. Making hair time a regular part of your child's schedule will help her adjust and cooperate with this brief period of stillness.

1 Eyeball your child's hair during bath or nap time. Look for her natural hair growth pattern. Plan to put her ponytail wherever her hair grows the thickest. This may be at the back of her head or on the top.

2 Buy the right hair products for your little one. Use a soft bristled baby hairbrush and hair bands made for small children. Brushing your child's hair with a grown-up brush could be a painful experience for her.

3 Place the brush and bands in the spot where you intend to work on your child's hair. If she likes to run, work in a restricted area, like her bedroom or a bathroom.

4 Put the child in your lap or sit together on a floor or couch. Give her something new and fascinating to entertain her, like a hand mirror or toy. For easier future sessions, put the toy away and only offer it during hair time to keep it interesting and special.

5 Brush the child's hair quickly with one hand and gather the hair together with your other hand. If her hair is in various stages of growth, only worry about cinching up the longest pieces. Smooth bumps out of the hair with the brush.

6 Wrap the baby bands two or three times around the child's ponytail to secure it.

Items you will need

  • Soft hairbrush
  • Baby bands
  • Mirror or toy

Tip

  • Babies can have sensitive scalps for several years. It's best to use a light touch when handling a small child's hair.

Warning

  • Avoid using barrette or hair accessories that could become choking hazards if they are pulled out or become loose.

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