Pimples appear on legs from shaving inflammation.

How to Get Rid of Pimples Behind the Legs From Shaving

by David Lipscomb

Pimples from shaving are actually in-grown hairs, caused by inflammation from the shaving process. These pimples are notorious for showing up in sensitive areas, such as the soft skin on the underside of the legs. Reducing the frequency -- and eliminating entirely -- pimples from shaving is done using over-the-counter and household remedies, along with employing better shaving technique.

1 Use an exfoliant prior to shaving. Reducing the amount of dead skin cells around the area to be shaved results in closer, smoother contact with the razor. Excess skin also prevents hair from properly growing back, creating an ingrown follicle. This also reduces the chance of pimples or a rash later on, since less pressure is needed to do the job.

2 Shave your legs with a sensitive-skin shaving cream, preferably in the shower or tub. The combination of hot water and a smooth shave reduces the likelihood of ingrown hairs.

3 Blot dry. Use an over-the-counter hydrocortisone -- or topical steroid -- cream after each shaving session.

4 Wrap a hot towel around your leg to open the pores, causing pustules to rise to the surface.

5 Tweeze away any visible hair poking through or next to the ingrown follicle pustule. Pull gently to release the hair and surrounding fluid.

6 Rub the inflamed area with a cotton ball soaked in isopropyl alcohol. The drying action of the alcohol spurs underlying skin to replace the dry and removed layer above.

7 Use blades with more razor elements. Blades featuring four or five razors within each cartridge reduce the likelihood of hairs getting pulled out as opposed to cut away.

Items you will need

  • Exfoliator
  • Shaving cream
  • Hydrocortisone cream
  • Hot towel
  • Tweezers
  • Isopropyl alcohol
  • Cotton balls
  • Multi-element razor blade cartridges

About the Author

David Lipscomb is a professional writer and public relations practitioner. Lipscomb brings more than a decade of experience in the consumer electronics and advertising industries. Lipscomb holds a degree in public relations from Webster University.

Photo Credits

  • Stockbyte/Valueline/Getty Images